NACLO 2017 a success!

William & Mary once again served as a site host for the North American Computational Linguistics Olympiad (NACLO). The event is an annual competition that engages high schoolers in language and logic problems. This year, we had around 10 students from local schools participate. Many thanks to the student volunteers, Jessica Campbell and Colin Wilson for their help promoting the event.

Prof. Parker and alumnus Daniel Lantz publish in topiCS

Prof. Dan Parker and recent graduate, Daniel Lantz (’16), just published their work  “Encoding and Accessing Linguistics Representations in a Dynamically Structured Holographic Memory System” in the journal Topics in Cognitive Science (topiCS). This paper is an extended version of their earlier 2016 paper of the same title that was published in the proceedings of the 2016 International Conference on Cognitive Modeling (ICCM)

Parker, D. & Lantz, D. (accepted). Encoding and Accessing Linguistic Representations in a Dynamically Structured Holographic Memory System. Topics in Cognitive Science, 9, 51-68. [pdf; supersedes the 2016 ICCM paper of the same title]

Prof. Parker publishes in Cognition

Prof. Dan Parker and Colin Phillips (U. of Maryland) just published their work on illusory negative polarity item (NPI) licensing in Cognition! In this paper, Parker and Phillips use standard psycholinguistic methodologies to show that by making minimal changes to a sentence, it is possible to selectively control the presence and absence of linguistic illusions involving NPIs. These findings turn out to be very informative about how linguistic structure is encoded in working memory. Check out the paper:

Negative polarity illusions and the format of hierarchical encodings in memory

New Semester, New People, New Developments

We’ve had a very productive start to the Fall 2016 semester. Our first big development is bringing onboard Erica Schneider as our first Lab Manager! We are very excited to have Erica join us. She is already whipping things into shape by organizing a series of engaging lab meetings. Earlier this semester, we heard about new developments from Prof. Anya Lunden’s research group, which consists of Prof. Lunden, and students Jessica Campbell and Mark Hutchens. They recently submitted a new paper that uses qualitative and quantitative methods to investigate typological stress patterns. Following that, Prof. Parker led a discussion about computational methods in language science. Next up on the agenda is a career development workshop designed to help students learn how to situate their linguistics skills and research experiences in a broader context to pursue a range of career opportunities.

Stay tuned for more updates. Plenty of things on the way, ranging from new papers to new outreach events.

Prof. Dan Parker & Alumnus Daniel Lantz receive award for outstanding paper

Prof. Dan Parker and recent graduate, Daniel Lantz, recently presented their paper “Encoding and Accessing Linguistics Representations in a Dynamically Structured Holographic Memory System” at the 14th International Conference on Cognitive Modeling (ICCM), where the paper was recognized as an “Outstanding Paper”. The award was selected by the international program committee and the conference chairs. Congratulations!

You can check out the paper here: [pdf]

Parker & Lantz publish in ICCM proceedings

Prof. Dan Parker and freshly minted W&M graduate Daniel Lantz will be heading to the Pennsylvania State University to give a talk on “Encoding and accessing linguistic representations in a dynamically structured holographic memory system” at the 2016 International Conference on Cognitive Modeling (ICCM 2016) August 4-6. The talk will present a new computational model designed to explain the selective behavior of illusory negative polarity item (NPI) licensing. Check out the proceedings paper here: http://parker.blogs.wm.edu/files/2016/06/ParkerLantz-ICCM.pdf  

Quentin Ullrich presents at the 2016 Harvard Undergraduate Linguistics Colloquium

Rising senior, Quentin Ullrich, got a sample of what’s it like to “pahk the cah on Hahvahd Yahd”, as a presenter at this year’s Harvard Undergraduate Colloquium.

Quentin’s talk titled: “Real Consumer Language: A Corpus-Based Approach to Trademark Law”, presented his findings on using social media data to inform trademark law. The research for his project was carried out in the Computational & Experimental Linguistics Lab (CELL), and will be developed further for his honors thesis. Great work Quentin!

Prof. Parker presents at CUNY 2016

Prof. Parker recently soaked up some rays in sunny Gainesville, Florida at the 2016 CUNY Conference on Human Sentence Processing. He presented three posters:

“Parallelism guides syntactic prediction for across-the-board extraction”, a collaboration with student Liana Abramson.

“A new model for processing antecedent-ellipsis mismatches”

“Agreement attraction is selective: Evidence from eye-tracking”

W&M takes it to the 2016 LSA meeting!

William & Mary researchers are taking it to the 2016 Linguistic Society of America (LSA) Annual Meeting, held in Washington DC from January 7-10. Here’s what you can look forward to:

Student Anna Henshaw and Anya Lunden will be presenting their joint work on “Consonant and vowel cues affecting the perception of Korean obstruents.” Anya will also be presenting independent research on “Finding secondary stress in Norwegian”.

Anne Charity Hudley will be leading a symposium that she organized with Christine Mallinson (University of Maryland, Baltimore County) on ‘Linguistics and the Broader University: The Significance of Linguistic Justice to Administration, Development, Program Building, and Public Affairs’.

Laura Heymann (William & Mary Law School) will be presenting her work on ‘Naming and reclaiming’ at the meeting for the American Name Society, which is held concurrently with the LSA.

Check out the program: LSA 2016 Annual Meeting Handbook